Moriah VanVleet

Management of department budget and general operations, including HR support for professors, lecturers and visitors; orientation and support for searches, new hires, visitors; visas, benefits, and payroll.

Elizabeth LaVarge-Baptista

Deposits, purchasing, accounts reconciliation, reimbursements, including travel and entertainment; graduate student personnel; librarian and work study supervision; course textbook and desk copy ordering coordination; website administration.

Rosie Taylor

Rosie’s love of the medieval period began in childhood and never left. Starting in 2008 she spent two summers on an archaeological dig in Iceland, where she became hooked on Viking-Age Scandinavia. She earned her B.A. in Medieval Studies from Smith College in 2012 with a focus on Old English language and Old Norse literature. » read more »

Ida Moen Johnson

Ida Moen Johnson’s interest in Scandinavian studies stems from her upbringing in a Scandinavian-American family and her studies of comparative literature. She earned her undergraduate degree in comparative literature in 2005 from Brown University where she focused on Spanish and French literature of the Caribbean. » read more »

Christian Gullette

Christian Gullette is a seventh-year Ph.D. candidate with a focus on contemporary Swedish literature and film and a designated emphasis in women, gender, and sexuality. His current dissertation research focuses on intersections of categories of race, masculinity and sexuality in contemporary Swedish literature and film as they are negotiated in the context of neoliberal economic discourse. » read more »

Jenna Coughlin

Jenna received her PhD in Scandinavian from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2017 with a dissertation titled “Conceptions of Nature in Nynorsk Poetry: Local Language and Situated Nature Knowledge in Ivar Aasen, Olav Nygard, and Aslaug Vaa.” Having received her BA in Anthropology from the University of Chicago, Jenna’s research is interdisciplinary, focusing on the intersection between language, literature, and cultural practice, especially at moments of significant environmental and social change. Her research on poetry focuses on how poets use poetic form and vernacular language to navigate these changes. She has two publications forthcoming on the poetry of Inger Elisabeth Hansen, and she has also published on postcolonialism in the work of Thor Heyerdahl. Jenna has taught Norwegian language at Berkeley, as well as courses on place, immigration, travel narratives, and nature in Scandinavian literature and culture.

Adam J. Carl

Adam J. Carl has had a lifelong fascination for Norse mythology, and was frequently unsatisfied with the subject’s treatment by coffee-table books. He is now pursuing a Ph.D. in the Scandinavian Department after studying at The Ohio State University and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark. » read more »

Zachary Blinkinsop

A Third Culture Kid and Air Force brat who grew up in Japan, Germany, and the United Kingdom, Zachary’s academic engagement with literature is tied closely to his interest in national identity.

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Lotta Weckström

Lotta Weckström’s research interest centers on sociolinguistics, social anthropology and the subjective, yet often shared, experience of migration, alternative narratives, digital humanities, ethnographic research, and oral histories. In her work, she combines sociolinguistics, rhetoric and argumentation and the study of migration in interdisciplinary projects. For her dissertation she worked with young people with Finnish background in Sweden focusing on cultural heritage, language use and feelings of national belonging. Her research specialties are linguistic minorities, migrant women in post-war Europe, and migration in all its manifestations.

Weckström is an experienced instructor, she has taught university level courses in her native Finland, in Germany, the Netherlands and in the US. She makes creative use of new classroom technology and aims to design the courses in a manner that involves students actively in the learning process. She is also a language instructor for Finnish as a second language and, in addition, teaches German language courses.

She works currently as a lecturer at Department of Scandinavian teaching courses in Finnish culture and history.

Books

Representations of Finnishness in Sweden. Studia Fennica. Linguistica, Finnish Literature Society, Helsinki. 2011. 173 pages.

Suomalaisuus on kuin vahakangas. Ruotsinsuomalaiset nuoret kertovat suomalaisuudestaan. Tutkimuksia A36. Siirtolaisuusinstituutti & Sverigefinnarnas Arkiv, Stockholm. 2011. 160 pages. (Finnishness is like a washcloth — Young Sweden Finns talk about Finnishness).

Linda H. Rugg

Professor Rugg’s research has long focused on issues related to self-construction and self-representation, particularly in textual autobiography and visual media. Authorship is another strong allied research interest, with special attention to the authorships and authorial personae of August Strindberg, Mark Twain, Ingmar Bergman, and a range of art cinema directors who perform as authors. In addition to her interest in autobiographical studies, Rugg has drawn inspiration for her research from two of the courses she teaches: “Ecology and Culture in Scandinavia” and “Hyperwhite: Policing the Boundaries of Whiteness in American Literature and Film.” The ecology course led to an exploration of the Scandinavian ecological subject in literature, art, and film, while the hyperwhite course (based originally on American culture) developed into a study of whiteness and race as represented in Nordic literature, film, and visual arts. She is working on articles and book projects in both of these fields. Rugg has been active as a translator of critical essays and literature from both Swedish and German into English. She enjoys lecturing and teaching in the broader community, both in individual presentations at diverse venues and through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University. She has served as a consultant on the Environmental Humanities to Sweden’s Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (MISTRA). For five years she acted as a member of the Modern Language Association’s Executive Division Committee for Autobiography, Biography, and Life-Writing, and she has also served as a member of the Executive Board for the Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Study. She is on the editorial board for Samlaren: Tidskrift för forskning om svensk och annan nordisk litteratur (Journal for the Study of Swedish and Other Nordic Literature.” She is a co-editor with colleague Professor Sanders for the third volume of the ICLA project, A Comparative History of Nordic Literary Cultures.

Books

Self-Projection: The Director’s Image in Art Cinema, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

Picturing Ourselves: Photography and Autobiography (1997) University of Chicago Press. 286 pages, 38 illustrations.